Mobility Aid Project News

Finally Here!

On December 9, 2013, in General News, Mobility Aid Project News, by jon
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This has been a long time coming… The Access Life Team has been waiting for a shipment of wheelchairs for over a year.  More importantly, there are many people with disabilities here in Bali that have been waiting for the wheelchairs.

Lisa, Ash, Daniel, and Pak David have been working hard signing papers, sending letters, seeking signatures, jumping through hoops, and cutting through endless red tape.  It has been a frustrating process, but we are happy to tell you that the wheelchairs were delivered to our storage building last week!

The team gathered at scheduled dropoff time of 9am to help unload 550 wheelchairs.  9am came and went…  We got word that the customs officials had ‘important matters’ to handle at the airport, so we waited some more.  Then we were told they would come  around 1pm… finally at about 3pm, five big trucks arrived full of the long awaited cargo.

Although it was really hard work, the time went by quick with lots of smiles and joking.  After two trips down to the harbor to unload the container, all the wheelchairs were in the storage building, the doors were sealed by customs officials for a mandatory two day waiting period, and we all headed home at around 9pm.

It was a long, tiring, great day!

Writing a speech
 

(This is a guest post from a good friend of ALB, Steve Gillard. Steve is a Physiotherapist in Newcastle, Australia.)

The smile says it all!!

On a recent family holiday to Bali I had the great pleasure of catching up with some friends on the Access Life Bali team. Having previously attended on a short term project for mobility, it was wonderful to catch up with past acquaintances such as sisters Mira and Liman. Wheel chair bound in January 2010, but now walking with light supervision only.

It was also challenging and rewarding to come across ‘accidental clients’, such as an 80 year old stroke victim on the north shore, somewhere hear Gerogkak. Essentially bed ridden for 10 years and relying on his 2 sons to carry him out for toileting, we found he has actually had enough recovery of muscle tone for basic mobility.

A wheelchair could be assembled and fitted on the spot by the ALB team, and the broad smile said it all! This one hour of our time has made an enormous impact on the quality of life for our accidental client.

Please remember your support for the ALB team.

– Steve

 

What You Can’t See

On April 27, 2012, in Mobility Aid Project News, by jon
4

Men Kamar: chatterbox, social butterfly, wheelchair recipient

Why is the lady in this picture covering up her face?  Is she sad, embarrassed, maybe angry?  We often like to show pictures of smiling people as they receive their wheelchairs.  However, to understand this one you’ll need to know a little more about Indonesian culture, and also, the lady in the wheelchair.

This is Men Kamar (Men has a similar meaning to Mama), she is a sweet lady that lives in the northern part of Bali.  Up until several years ago, she was living in the mountains on her own.  Despite her age, she diligently walked around her village selling herbal drinks that are very popular here.  Then she had an accident that left her unable to walk and was moved to the city to live with her son.  Her son is very busy, and Men Kamar would  spend many days alone in her bedroom.  Because she was so used to interacting with all the people in her village, her new situation was very difficult for her not just physically, but socially and emotionally as well.

When we first met Men Kamar, she seemed very quiet, and we all assumed she was a bit of an introvert.  However, when Ibu Kadek and Pak Nyoman seated her in the wheelchair and she began to wheel herself around her house, you could tell that she was starting to realize that life could be better.  It took less than five minutes for the transformation…  she started wheeling around, telling stories, laughing and making jokes.  It was a real privilege to see the real Men Kamar emerging from her shell.

So when we finally asked to take a picture, she tried her best to keep a straight face.  It’s important to understand that most Indonesian adults above the age of 40, especially those from more rural areas, will not smile for a formal picture.  I am not quite sure about the cultural reasons for this, but it is generally true.  They will stand straight, look directly at the camera, but rarely smile.

She completely failed in keeping a straight face.  The smile wouldn’t go away.  Men Kamar was excited about a life that included talking with her friends as they passed by the front of her house, enjoying the morning sunshine, and finally getting out of that lonely bedroom.

Thanks for helping us bring hope to people in Bali like Men Kamar.

 

Getting a renewed lease on life

On October 12, 2011, in Mobility Aid Project News, by sashi
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Today a team of ALB folk (a visiting OT from Australia, Melinda Conroy; 2 of the ALB staff, Lisa and Arie; and Carolyn our translator friend) visited Mrs Rumi, a 95 year old great grandmother who lives in the Denpasar area. She had a dislocated hip 6 years ago which Melinda  thought had never healed properly and since then she has had a number of other falls. She received a wheelchair from us 6 months ago but never used it. Her family didn’t see how useful the wheelchair could be and thought it would be easier to move her manually from place to place ( esp as there were stairs that she couldn’t negotiate with the wheelchair). The wheelchair had been consigned to a shed and was literally gathering dust and cobwebs. When the team arrived, Mrs Rumi was sitting on the concrete floor of the house’s central courtyard, feeling pretty despondent and  said that she just wish she could die!

The team started thinking of options for her mobility. They realised crutches were not an option due to the amount of falls she had already sustained as well her age being a consideration.  The courtyard of the house was quite big and flat and potentially Mrs Rumi couldlearn to wheel herself around this area and be part of the daily activities, many of which take place in this courtyard. The team offered to tailor some foam seating for her wheelchair ( after it had been cleaned up of course) that would make it more comfortable for her use.

Melinda taught Mrs Rumi how to move forwards, backwards and turning around in her wheelchair  so she could get around the courtyard by herself- though this really was a team effort as Melinda gave instructions in English and Carolyn and Arie translated them into Indonesian. Before long,she was whizzing around the courtyard , smiling and enjoying her independence! The team even came up with a creative way to use the stair/step for her to be able to get into and out of the wheelchair with minimal assistance.

Mrs Rumi can sit in the chair to do some of her chores or jobs that they can give her to do. Her family had not really expected her to help out around the house because of her lack of mobility and her age. But the team were able to show that Mrs Rumi CAN help out a bit more – this should give her more of a sense of purpose and of being needed which would help with her emotional stability and some hope for living.

Ibu Rumi being helped into her chair by her grandson

Showing her how to wheel herself around

A gentle smile as she relishes the independence her mobility has given to her

 

Getting Mobile

On May 25, 2011, in Mobility Aid Project News, by sashi
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This is the logo on the back of the new MATeam work shirts we are having made. The design was created in house by one of the brains on team! The MATeam are looking forward to having these new shirts to wear as they head out to visit patients.

Here are 2 of the people we’ve recently helped get mobile:

Many years ago, Mr Gede, now 75 years old,  fell from a tree and was in a coma for 25 days in Amlapura Hospital.  Three years ago, Mr Gede fell again and broke his collar bone, one of his ribs, one of his hip bones and also his wrist! This resulted in his current paralysis/inability to get around. Mr Gede was  very happy to receive a wheelchair from ALB and FWM – he never dreamed he’d ever have one as his family are very poor and there was no way they would have been able to afford it.

When she was just 19, Ms Putu suddenly went weak in her legs and resulted in paralysis (very likely as a result of some untreated illness, people here seldom go to a doctor). Her shoulder also looks like it is out of its socket and her back is so weak as to be unable to support her weight and her whole body is now in a weakened state. She is now 25 years old.

The team gave her a wheelchair which will help her family to get her out and about, to at least get some fresh air. They are very grateful for this assistance as they could never have afforded it.

And these wheelchairs are courtesy of Free Wheelchair Mission – the team have quite a job (and apparently a lot of fun) of putting it together.

 

Access Life Bali Clean Water and Mobility Aid projects would be non-existent if it were not for the support and generosity of many people.

Today we are happy to announce that we’ve made it easier to partner with us and support Access Life Bali to provide hope and care to people with disabilities and to communities without access to clean water.

We’ve launched an online donations form where you can give a one-off gift or make a longer term commitment with regular contributions.

People often ask us how much impact they can make with their donation. To give you a guide, we’ve created a small list of suggested donation amounts which shows you how far your money can go. Click on the image below for suggestions:

Thank you for considering financially supporting our work here. Your kindness and compassion can be crucial to changing someone’s life.

Cheers,
The Access Life Bali Team

download adobe acrobat
 

In House Training

On January 27, 2011, in General News, Mobility Aid Project News, by sashi
1

On Monday 24th Jan, Clair Young, a friend of Access Life Bali, came in to give us all some training about non verbal communication skills for special needs children. We learnt a bit about cerebral palsy, Down’s Syndrome and autism and how to reach out and connect with kids that have these disabilities. The most important things is to have patience ,to invest time into these kids and their families and to TEACH their families how to reach out and care for the special needs kids. In most cases, the families have not been given an accurate diagnosis ( so many families think their children were disabled by a dose of polio when in fact they might have contracted meningitis which was not treated). Many parents just need help in how to communicate with their kids, to understand they are not mentally retarded just because they are autistic, and to help them to become independent to the best of their ability. It was an eye opening session for all of us!

Listening and learning about special needs kids

 

 

We’ve put together an interactive map of just some of the Access Life Bali Clean Water and Mobility Aid Projects we have been working on here in Bali, Indonesia.

You can click on different parts of the map to see what we have been doing in each area of Bali, as well as click through to a story, related blog post or video about that specific project.

Click on the image above to visit the interactive project map, or checkout out projects page.

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Video of Mr. Merdu as Promised

On September 1, 2010, in Mobility Aid Project News, by sashi
2

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As promised, here is a short clip of Mr. Merdu up and walking about. It is exciting to have seen his progress throughout the last year. His son is pretty excited that his dad is able to walk again, too, as you can see at the very end of this video.

You can read the full story of of our Mobility Aid Project patient Mr. Merdu here.

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We first met Mr Merdu in July 2009 ,about 4 months after he received reconstructive back surgery.  He showed us impressive x-rays of the amount of metal in his back, but he was unable to even lift his legs or shift them from side-to-side because of severe atrophy.  His back problems were the result of a severe case of tuberculosis that got into his bones and weakened his back. 

We were able to get him through a full course of antibiotics and taught his wife how to perform some simple therapy to try to get some mobility and strength in his legs.  We were encouraged as slowly we began to see progress in muscle strength and encouraged him to continue with the therapy.  He had been given a wheelchair by a family member that worked in the city, so we helped Mr Merdu and his wife learn how to use it as safely as possible. 

As the months passed his legs got stronger and stronger.  We then gave Mr Merdu some simple exercises that he could do on his own.  As he continued to progress through this stage, we encouraged him to add some light weights to his exercise routine.  He was very determined and continued to show good progress.  After about 6 months we showed some of his friends and family members a picture of walking rails and within an hour Mr Merdu had a good place to begin to practice walking.  Again he showed a lot of determination and practiced his walking exercises several times a day. 

When we had a team of physical therapists and occupational therapists here in January 2010, they were able to meet Mr Merdu and give him some more tips in rebuilding muscle strength, more specific walking exercises and learning to use his legs again.  Another 2 months passed and Mr Merdu had progressed to being able to get around on a set of crutches.  You could see how excited he was to have more freedom again to get out and about, and we were happy to have seen him progress so far.  Mr  Merdu, however, was not running out of determination and he continued to work hard on the walking bars.  Now, about one year, after we first met him bedridden and scared, we cannot track him down to get one last picture to post on the blog because he is always out working. 

He is walking without ANY mobility aids and has returned to collecting cloves, a seasonal job available in his area.  We will try to get a picture of him soon, but for now he is too busy!

Update: We have also posted a video of Mr Merdu, now walking!

Mr Merdu with Daniel Jan 2010

He exercised daily morning and evening on custom built bamboo bars

With visiting physical therapist, Mandy (facing), Daniel, and Made Reni ( local team member)

By March 2010, he'd moved onto crutches

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